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Future Endeavored: 18 Most Talked-About Terminations in WWE History

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Hundreds upon thousands of men and women have passed through the front doors at Titan Towers, in the hopes of one day attaining immortality by becoming a WWE Superstar. Unfortunately, while thousands apply, only about a hundred slots are ever available at the same time. Those lucky contenders are then forced to deal with the encroaching fear of being fired on a somewhat regular basis. We—as wrestling fans—hate to see the words “future” and “endeavor” appear side by side on the WWE’s website—but imagine how it makes the talent feel. Forget expired contracts and mutually agreed-upon exits; today we’ll take a look at some of the most noteworthy releases in company history. This is “Future Endeavored: Most Talked-About Terminations in WWE History.”

 

The Hebner Family’s Five Finger Discount
The Hebner Family was synonymous with the World Wrestling Federation, dating back to Dave Hebner’s initial debut. Dave’s twin brother Earl debuted in 1988 during the infamous “Double Referee” storyline, which was the catalyst for the WrestleMania IV tournament. Earl’s son Brian also became a referee, and worked for the WWE until 2005. In fact—all three Hebners worked for the WWE until 2005. On July 18, the WWE announced the termination of Earl Hebner, as well as his son, for illegally reselling WWE merchandise. Dave, the longest-tenured of the three, was released the following day. The Hebners were caught selling WWE-licensed materials at their St. Louis-based sports shop, without the consent of company officials.

 

Lance Cade Has a Seizure in the Sky
Lance Cade was a former WWE Tag Team Champion, a graduate of Shawn Michael’s Wrestling Academy, and protégé to then-world champion Chris Jericho. He seemed to have everything going for him, but sadly, Cade—real name Lance McNaught—was unable to shake the monkey from his back. Cade spent nine years with the WWE, and was released in 2010 following an inflight drug-induced seizure. Jim Ross said Cade “made a major league mistake while utilizing bad judgment and that it was instrumental in his departure.”

 

Grandmaster Sexay is a Drug Mule
He’s the son of Jerry “The King” Lawler and former partner to both Scotty 2 Hotty and WWE Hall of Famer Rikishi—but did you know Grandmaster Sexay was also a DRUG MULE? Perhaps that’s a bit extreme, but in 2001—at the height of his team’s popularity—Brian Christopher was released from his contract, following an incident at the Canadian Border. Brian was charged with transporting illicit substances into the United States, and was subsequently absent from WWE until 2004.

 

Buff Bagwell is a Mama’s Boy
Buff Bagwell was nominated Rookie of the Year in 1990, and in 2001 the Wrestling Observer called him the “Most Embarrassing Wrestler.” That was the year WCW closed, and talent contracts were absorbed by the World Wrestling Federation. Buff wasn’t embarrassing based on what he did between the ropes, nor was his character an embarrassment. Marcus “Buff the Stuff” Bagwell was embarrassing because he—at the age of 31, with eleven years in the business—allowed his mother to call Titan Towers, and speak on his behalf. The famous Judy Bagwell was notorious for calling WWE Headquarters, and demanding that her son be given time off and a lighter work schedule. This lead, of course, to an infinitely lighter schedule. Buff was released from his contract on July 9th, one week after making his television debut.

 

Muhammad Hassan Worked Too Well
The problem with 99.9% of failed gimmicks is that they couldn’t get over with the audience. From rappers to plumbers to party animals—if the fans don’t believe in the character, they aren’t going to buy into the overall product. Muhammad Hassan was a character played by New York-native Mark Copani. Copani began wrestling in 2002, and by 2005, was deeply embedded in storylines featuring the Undertaker and Hulk Hogan. The problem with Muhammad Hassan isn’t that he didn’t work—it’s that he worked too well. His portrayal of an Arab-American terrorist resonated with a nation, rocked by the very notion of sleeper cells. After an especially graphic “invasion” featuring masked “terrorists,” Hassan was forced to apologize, and was sent back to developmental to work on his character. He was later released, because nothing was going to top Muhammad Hassan.

 

Bull Nakano’s Running Rails
The World Wrestling Federation reintroduced their women’s title in 1993, after more than three years since deactivating the championship. Only three women held the title during the brief resurgence that concluded in October 1995—one of them was Bull Nakano. Bull was a highly-talented Japanese women’s wrestler, made famous by her time on the All Japan Women’s roster. In 1994, Bull was the top heel in the women’s division, and won the championship from Alundra Blayze in her native Japan. Bull stood atop the female roster for four and a half months. Her rise in marketability lost all momentum, however, when Bull was found to be in possession of cocaine. WWE immediately fired her; Bull turned up in WCW before returning to Japan.

 

Daniel Bryan takes on Justin Roberts
Before he became the leader of the “Yes Movement,” but after he was dubbed, “The American Dragon,” Daniel Bryan was a contestant on NXT. The Original NXT—where popular independent and developmental wrestlers competed for a WWE contract. Bryan came in second place to Wade Barrett, but the outcome was inconsequential. Less than one week after the first season finale, the NXT participants invaded Raw as the newly christened “Nexus.” They attacked ring crew and referees, as well as John Cena. Daniel Bryan centered his attention on ring announcer Justin Roberts. Bryan choked Roberts with his own tie, and was fired for doing so the very next day.

 

Serena Enjoys a Beverage or Two
CM Punk and his “Straight Edge Society” broke new ground when they took their drug-free lifestyle to confrontational new heights. Clearly, Luke “Doc” Gallows isn’t straight-edge; anyone who’s heard him speak outside the ring knows the “Good Brother” enjoys a cold refreshment. But Gallows had the foresight to keep his extra-curricular indulgences private, at least during that time. Serena Deeb, on the other hand, did not. Serena—CM Punk’s bald-headed female follower—was caught out and about on several occasions, enjoying the nightlife and partaking in the kind of behavior her on-screen character spoke-out against. Needless to say, Serena’s contract was terminated.

 

Nailz Has a Brush with the Boss
Nailz debuted for the WWE in 1992. His character was that of an escaped convict, so it was only natural for him to feud with a Cobb County Correction’s Officer. He wrestled the Big Boss Man at Survivor Series, and slowly faded into obscurity. Dissatisfied with his position in the company, Nailz confronted WWE Chairman Vince McMahon in his Stamford office. Bret Hart was in the building at the time, and could recall hearing a “loud thud,” followed by screaming. Nailz knocked Vince out of his chair, and proceeded to choke the millionaire promoter on the floor of his own office. Nailz was fired; he filed a “wrongful termination” suit, claiming Vince McMahon gave him steroids.

 

The British Bulldog’s British Pharmacy
The British Bulldog Davey Boy Smith was well on his way to world championship greatness. In 1992, Davey headlined Summerslam against his brother-in-law Bret Hart, in front of more than 80,000 fans. He won the intercontinental championship, and was positioned to sky rocket right into the main event picture the very next year. It seemed nothing could derail Davey Boy Smith, except maybe—for Davey Boy Smith? He and the Ultimate Warrior were found in connection with an illegal pharmacy supplying steroids and human growth hormone. Davey dropped the intercontinental title to Shawn Michaels in October, and was released from his contract shortly thereafter. He returned in 1994, but only enjoyed moderate success as a tag team competitor.

 

Public Enemy was a Public Enemy
The Public Enemy was a novelty tag team, comprised of Johnny Grunge and Rocco Rock. Public Enemy introduced fans to tables long before the Dudleyz became synonymous with destroying furniture. The duo got their start in ECW, during which time they became four time tag team champions. They went on to WCW, where they also earned tag team championship gold. In 1999, the Public Enemy finally arrived in WWE—but there was a problem. WWE pursued the Public Enemy in 1995, but the team opted to sign with WCW instead. Many of the veteran performers, including Bradshaw and Farooq, took issue with their desire to join the company four years later. They lasted just two months in the company, and took several real beatings from the Acolytes. Already on thin ice, the two were fired after trying to change the finish to a match halfway through the bout.

 

Tiger Ali Singh Hates the Rain
Tiger Jeet Singh was one of the most prolific performers in professional wrestling history. His son, Tiger Ali Singh, was not. Ali debuted in 1997, and was—believe it or not—gainfully employed by the WWE until 2002. So where did he go? In 2000, WWE sent Tiger Ali Singh to Puerto Rico to work on his in-ring skills with Carlos Colon. After a brief reappearance on the main roster, Ali was sent back to Puerto Rico, this time to Victor Quinones’ International Wrestling Association. Ali became a two time tag team champion, but was sidelined after taking a dangerous bump in an outdoor ring filled with rain. He suffered what was believed to be a “career-ending injury,” and was fired by the WWE for failing to appear as advertised. Tiger Ali Singh subsequently sued the WWE for $7 million. Among his plentiful grievances were allegations of racism on the main roster, unsafe work environments in Puerto Rico, and one instance where wrestlers “filled his turban with garbage.” The lawsuit was settled out of court, but Tiger Ali Singh was never rehired and has since been blacklisted from performing in America.

 

Abraham Washington is Unstoppable
Abraham Washington was a short-lived managerial character, who represented Los Matadores and the Prime Time Players. Washington’s gimmick was incredibly innovative; he took on the role of a late night TV show host, complete with leather couches and a sidekick—WWE Hall of Famer Tony Atlas. Washington was known for making jokes and providing commentary during his client’s matches. While most of the ribs were all in good fun, one particular line landed Abraham in hot water, and eventually cost him his job. On the July 30th, 2012 edition of Monday Night Raw, Washington said: “Titus O’Neil is like Kobe Bryant in a hotel room in Colorado—he’s unstoppable.” Two weeks later, Abraham Washington violated a company mandate when he Tweeted his political support for Titan Sports founder Linda McMahon. He was released soon thereafter.

 

Mr. Perfect and the Plane Ride from Hell
Mr. Perfect was a staple of World Wrestling Federation programming during the early ‘90s, and continued to play a role on screen until the New Generation took hold in 1996. His return in 2002 felt like a homecoming, and it seemed that Curt Hennig never left. An admitted prankster and locker room ribber, Hennig developed a healthy reputation for off-camera shenanigans. But later that year, on board what was later dubbed “The Plane Ride from Hell,” Hennig took backstage horseplay to all new heights. Hennig was convinced that he could outwrestle the NCAA Heavyweight Champion Brock Lesnar, and challenged the Beast to a bout in the aisle of the airplane. Brock, only 24 at the time, obliged Hennig’s request, and the two battled across the aircraft. Mr. Perfect was fired immediately, and Brock Lesnar won the WWE Championship three months later.

 

Marty Jannetty is on House Arrest
Marty Jannetty has been on-and-off good terms with the WWE for his entire career. Less than two months ago, Marty made waves in social media when he alleged Triple H is not the biological father of Stephanie McMahon’s children. In 1992, Shawn Michaels super-kicked Jannetty through a plate glass window on Brutus Beefcake’s Barbershop. Shawn went on to win the intercontinental championship, while big things were also in the works for Marty. Unfortunately, Marty was soon-after charged with drug possession and put on house arrest. He was later released from his contract—for the first time.

 

Brad Maddox Hates Cocky Pricks
Brad Maddox is the most recent name on this lengthy list of liquidated superstars; the former Raw General Manager is just four months removed from his stint in WWE. In November 2015, Maddox was released from his WWE contract after making lascivious comments during a Smackdown dark match. While cutting a promo on his opponents, Maddox used the phrase “cocky pricks”—much to the chagrin of WWE Chairman Vince McMahon.

 

Psicosis’ Grand Theft Auto
Most wrestling fans will best remember Psicosis as a two-time WCW Cruiserweight Champion, and—along with Rey Mysterio—a pioneer of the Cruiserweight style. He was also a member of the WWE locker room for a brief period between 2005 and 2006. Along with Super Crazy and Juventud Guerrera, Psicosis was one-third of the Mexicools. Regardless of his professional accolades, it’s safe to assume Alexander Valencia Ramirez will best remember Psicosis as the man who stole his car on October 9, 2006. Psicosis asked to “borrow” Ramirez’s car, and when the demand was refused, pulled a gun on the driver. He was arrested in Baja California Mexico, and immediately released from his WWE contract. It was later revealed the gun Psicosis used was a realistic water pistol.

 

Hacksaw and the Iranian Tobacco
Last but not least is one of the most iconic road stories in wrestling history. Hacksaw Jim Duggan and the Iron Sheik were driving down the Garden State Parkway, traveling between New York City and Philadelphia. The Sheik requested they stop and pick up a case of beer, to which Hacksaw immediately obliged. Eventually, the duo began to partake in some Iranian Tobacco. They were subsequently pulled over and arrested; Jim Duggan says it was the stupidest mistake he’s ever made. His father—the police chief in his hometown—was disappointed, and Vince McMahon was utterly embarrassed. McMahon fired Hacksaw with the immortal words: “What have you done to us, Jim?”

 

http://www.dailywrestlingnews.com/future-endeavored-18-most-talked-about-terminations-in-wwe-history/

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I think Buff went on Stone Cols's podcast and said he got fired for something else. Think he said he actually got fired over an incident with Shane Helms backstage and he always says JR sabotaged his career.

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Cade needed help, they shouldn't have released him. Didn't he have that heart attack that killed him shortly after?

 

You still need to fire someone who has a cocaine-induced seizure on a company trip. I mean...ffs. At best, they should have kept a close eye on him and helped him with rehab. Which they probably would have done...had he actually survived for a longer period of time. Anyway, Cade was one of my top picks at that time for a future champion. He was the complete package to me. Just a damn shame what he brought on himself.

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Still pissed about what happened to Muhammad Hassan. Total missed star right there imo.

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The Hebners were caught selling WWE-licensed materials at their St. Louis-based sports shop, without the consent of company officials.

The famous Judy Bagwell was notorious for calling WWE Headquarters, and demanding that her son be given time off and a lighter work schedule.

Nailz knocked Vince out of his chair, and proceeded to choke the millionaire promoter on the floor of his own office.

Marty made waves in social media when he alleged Triple H is not the biological father of Stephanie McMahons children.

It was later revealed the gun Psicosis used was a realistic water pistol.

 

Looooooool, I love Pro Wrestling.

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the Serena one was bullshit. they have Bray Wyatt today going out to charity events breaking his character but god forbid someone go out in the personal life on their own time go out have drink or two. and they could have made a story out of it. she fell off the wagon because of the pressure of 'media and advertisements'. you know how Vince likes to make real life shit into angles.

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Still pissed about what happened to Muhammad Hassan. Total missed star right there imo.

 

Copani had a lot of potential, I think the character was too close to real world events to ever come back in any form. I suppose too there was always the risk that Copani would still be known as Hassan, whatever character he portrayed.

 

The Marty fall is very sad, because in Shawn's (I'm always bringing it back to him, aren't I?) book he said it looked like Marty had sorted himself out and been "saved". Guess not.

 

The "Plane Ride From Hell" also was the end of Scott Hall, who should have been on the list - as should JR being fired over a very emotional (and drunk) Ric Flair being selected for a panel, weeks after he'd found his own son dead.

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That was an interesting read. Holy *Censored* at that guy trying to kill Vince and lolwtf at the attempted armed robbery.

 

WWE are petty for wrecking that team who went to WCW instead, then firing them though.

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Still vexxed by the whole Muhammaed Hassan situation. The guy was so good, fired for being so good, all because of UPN's being all PC in regards to acts centering around Islamic culture and 9/11.

 

And I wish some superstar did what Nailz did to Vince today, hopefully knocking some sense, or whats left of it anyways, into head and changing his outdated ways in regards to talent.

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Cade needed help, they shouldn't have released him. Didn't he have that heart attack that killed him shortly after?

 

You still need to fire someone who has a cocaine-induced seizure on a company trip. I mean...ffs. At best, they should have kept a close eye on him and helped him with rehab. Which they probably would have done...had he actually survived for a longer period of time. Anyway, Cade was one of my top picks at that time for a future champion. He was the complete package to me. Just a damn shame what he brought on himself.

 

Was it definitely cocaine-induced? I haven't heard much about it.

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Still vexxed by the whole Muhammaed Hassan situation. The guy was so good, fired for being so good, all because of UPN's being all PC in regards to acts centering around Islamic culture and 9/11.

 

And I wish some superstar did what Nailz did to Vince today, hopefully knocking some sense, or whats left of it anyways, into head and changing his outdated ways in regards to talent.

 

Wasn't 9/11 that finished it. It was the fact that he was portraying the most obvious part of the "terrorist" angle on Smackdown, which happened to air the very same day as Islamic extremists bombed the centre of London. Had that not occurred it probably would have been seen through to conclusion. Sadly I thought the whole idea of the character was supposed to be that he WASN'T a terrorist - but the piano wire incident with the Undertaker left no doubt.

 

Hassan was a great chance for WWE to make a positive role model, but they went right down the "cheap heat" Sgt Slaughter route.

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In regards to Lance Cade -- When it first happened, reports were it was drug related. After he passed it was revealed through his autopsy report that the guy had serious health issues regardless, and I think had a history of seizures, even when drugs weren't in the picture.


 

Still vexxed by the whole Muhammaed Hassan situation. The guy was so good, fired for being so good, all because of UPN's being all PC in regards to acts centering around Islamic culture and 9/11.

 

And I wish some superstar did what Nailz did to Vince today, hopefully knocking some sense, or whats left of it anyways, into head and changing his outdated ways in regards to talent.

 

Wasn't 9/11 that finished it. It was the fact that he was portraying the most obvious part of the "terrorist" angle on Smackdown, which happened to air the very same day as Islamic extremists bombed the centre of London. Had that not occurred it probably would have been seen through to conclusion. Sadly I thought the whole idea of the character was supposed to be that he WASN'T a terrorist - but the piano wire incident with the Undertaker left no doubt.

 

Hassan was a great chance for WWE to make a positive role model, but they went right down the "cheap heat" Sgt Slaughter route.

 

 

 

Didn't say it was. But that was one of the reasons dirtsheets were reporting at the time, as coming from UPN and their decision to voice to WWE that they didn't want the character on their stations. The London bombings was also a part of it, but I'm just saying, UPN and their feelings and views on the matter were the primary reason he was released.

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In regards to Lance Cade -- When it first happened, reports were it was drug related. After he passed it was revealed through his autopsy report that the guy had serious health issues regardless, and I think had a history of seizures, even when drugs weren't in the picture.

 

Still vexxed by the whole Muhammaed Hassan situation. The guy was so good, fired for being so good, all because of UPN's being all PC in regards to acts centering around Islamic culture and 9/11.

 

And I wish some superstar did what Nailz did to Vince today, hopefully knocking some sense, or whats left of it anyways, into head and changing his outdated ways in regards to talent.

 

Wasn't 9/11 that finished it. It was the fact that he was portraying the most obvious part of the "terrorist" angle on Smackdown, which happened to air the very same day as Islamic extremists bombed the centre of London. Had that not occurred it probably would have been seen through to conclusion. Sadly I thought the whole idea of the character was supposed to be that he WASN'T a terrorist - but the piano wire incident with the Undertaker left no doubt.

 

Hassan was a great chance for WWE to make a positive role model, but they went right down the "cheap heat" Sgt Slaughter route.

 

 

 

Didn't say it was. But that was one of the reasons dirtsheets were reporting at the time, as coming from UPN and their decision to voice to WWE that they didn't want the character on their stations. The London bombings was also a part of it, but I'm just saying, UPN and their feelings and views on the matter were the primary reason he was released.

 

Ah okay, but I think 7/7 was the "straw that broke the camel's back for them" I believe Sky were extremely upset too. At the very least, London was the excuse they were looking for to make an overwhelming case.

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Cade needed help, they shouldn't have released him. Didn't he have that heart attack that killed him shortly after?

 

You still need to fire someone who has a cocaine-induced seizure on a company trip. I mean...ffs. At best, they should have kept a close eye on him and helped him with rehab. Which they probably would have done...had he actually survived for a longer period of time. Anyway, Cade was one of my top picks at that time for a future champion. He was the complete package to me. Just a damn shame what he brought on himself.

 

i heard report he refuse to go to rehab

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Cade needed help, they shouldn't have released him. Didn't he have that heart attack that killed him shortly after?

 

You still need to fire someone who has a cocaine-induced seizure on a company trip. I mean...ffs. At best, they should have kept a close eye on him and helped him with rehab. Which they probably would have done...had he actually survived for a longer period of time. Anyway, Cade was one of my top picks at that time for a future champion. He was the complete package to me. Just a damn shame what he brought on himself.

 

i heard report he refuse to go to rehab

 

That was Amy Winehouse.

And it wasn't a report, it was a song.

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Cade needed help, they shouldn't have released him. Didn't he have that heart attack that killed him shortly after?

 

You still need to fire someone who has a cocaine-induced seizure on a company trip. I mean...ffs. At best, they should have kept a close eye on him and helped him with rehab. Which they probably would have done...had he actually survived for a longer period of time. Anyway, Cade was one of my top picks at that time for a future champion. He was the complete package to me. Just a damn shame what he brought on himself.

 

i heard report he refuse to go to rehab

 

That was Amy Winehouse.

And it wasn't a report, it was a song.

 

i know the difference between a song and a report it came out just after his release as one of the rumor reason he was fired

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It helps to read that in the voices of Adam and Simon from the What Culture YouTube channels. Makes it even funnier.

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For the plane ride from hell incident, Lesnar did actually get punished on screen. He took a beatdown from the Hardyz on Raw and did not win cleanly for about two more weeks-(he disqualified himself during matches). Everyone involved in that incident did catch hell.

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i heard report he refuse to go to rehab

 

 

 

That was Amy Winehouse.

And it wasn't a report, it was a song.

 

i know the difference between a song and a report it came out just after his release as one of the rumor reason he was fired

 

 

This dude actually responded seriously to the most obvious joke I've ever seen on the internet.

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i heard report he refuse to go to rehab

 

 

 

That was Amy Winehouse.

And it wasn't a report, it was a song.

 

i know the difference between a song and a report it came out just after his release as one of the rumor reason he was fired

 

 

This dude actually responded seriously to the most obvious joke I've ever seen on the internet.

 

 

They try and tell me Austin3035 is a troll but i say a no, no, no.

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